VISIT MEXICO MAKE THE PACKAGE TO YOUR MEASURE IN THE STATE YOU WISH TO VISIT WITH THE BEST PRICES
The coexistence of Indians and Spaniards

From the beginning of the colonization, the indigenous groups were isolated from the Spaniards. There was even the idea of extending throughout the territory the so-called Republic and Indian republic structure. In the sixteenth century, the outline of Mexico City included the separation of the Spaniards and the Indians as an excuse for evangelization. In this way, both republics in the sense of the community had to have a place to sit with different governments and different legal plans.

Economic activities were also separate: indigenous people were in charge of doing practical work, such as public and private constructions. At the same time this separation favored different ancient activities such as hunting and fishing, even the chinampas, which is agriculture in floating gardens, which were placed on small boats.

Of course, the distance between Spaniards and Indians allowed the natives to continue with their religious rituals and practices of their ancestors. In addition, this policy of segregation failed on the borders of the land. Spaniards avaricious in increasing their possessions gradually penetrated the indigenous territories; The Indians, for their part, entered the Spanish city to be employed in urban activities such as services and shops. Little by little, the mixture of cultures overturned the barriers between the two republics in the urban area, a floating population seemed to increase its importance day by day: muleteros, packers, masons, cooks, artisans, nannies and maids. By the seventeenth century, the fact that the boundaries between the Spanish city and the indigenous city had disappeared was undeniable. The mixed and caste group had grown rapidly and alternating between one and the other, and the same thing happened to the blacks. The special division still existed, since the Spaniards lived in the center of the city and the Indians in the environs; The Spanish line continued, but the mixture of cultures and blood had surpassed the frontiers that had been established initially.