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Passage to immortality

Through the history of mankind, the end of life has troubled men of different cultures and times, after the perishing body dies, will it be my end? Will my passing through this world be forgotten? Distressing questions that must have passed through the mind of an Egyptian pharaoh, Caesar Roman, and why not? For that of a Mexican Tlacatecuhtli; Especially if we remember the Aztecs as they thought of themselves, as the city that chose Huizilopochtli, to keep it alive. Would not his kind of reward have an important mission?

The answer was in Chapultepec, a sacred forest for the Mexicas, where great kings of this city sent people to sculpt their effigies to be immortal. Chapultepec was the last home of the Aztecs before settling on the Plateau of Anahuac. After the greater temple was founded, the great forests of Ahuehuetes as they are also known, the place became like a place of recreation for the emperors, who possessed a palace at the bottom of the hill. The upper part was occupied by a temple of idols that gave the forest its character as a sacred place.

This explains why the great lords of Mexico-Tenochtitlán chose him to transcend in the memory of the time. There was Tlacaelel, great organizer of the empire; Then Moctezuma I, Ahuizotl and finally Axayacatl. The latter, when he began to feel ill, asked that his effigy be left carved in stone in Chapultepec, next to the effigy of Moctezuma I, when the representation of stone finished demanded to see it. There they brought him weakened by his illness and in front of his statue took leave of the lords of his kingdom. He died on the way back on the people who transported him in the year 1481, as other monuments of the past figures were destroyed little by little. Some people of the 19th century tell us that they were broken by some individuals who thought there was a hidden treasure inside. The engineer Rivera Cambas, in his book "Quaint Mexico Artistic and Monumental" tells us that the effigy that lasted the longest was Moctezuma I, until 1753.